Articulation 3: the virtual salon

December 7, 2016 at 6:06 pm | Posted in hands-on, projects, Uncategorized | Leave a comment
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The central idea of this resource was the virtual salon, based on a panoramic photo I took of the Shine salon:

salonpano2

Using sliders to pan the photo

As previously mentioned, I found an article by Glenn Simsek on the Articulate user forums that showed how to create a scrollable panorama based on two Storyline sliders.

  • Slider 1 has the panoramic photo as the slider button ‘fill texture’
  • Slider 2 is visible to the learner and is used to pan the photo

I scaled the photo so it was the correct height to fit my design for the 960px x 720px (px = pixel) slide; so the height is 342px and width is 2048px. In fact I resized all images to minimise the bandwidth required by the resource.

Storyline objects are layered, and I added a copy of the background image with a transparent window (600 x 342 px). This acts as a frame that overlays the photo so that only a 600px width slice of the photo is visible at any one time.

sh-sliders

The blue bar behind the photo in this image is the Storyline slider 1. I needed to calculate the width of the slider so that it matched the width of the photo. If the photo is panned hard left, then the hidden part is (2048-600)=1448px wide. Ditto if panned hard right. The total width of slider must allow for 1448px on each side of the 600px width central window; so width = 1448 + 600 + 1448 = 3496px.

This was set on the Slider Design tab, along with parameters to centre the photo when the learners arrive in the virtual salon. I also set the slider to move in 100 discrete steps; this looks visually smooth and enabled me to easily use the value of variable Slider 1 for triggers that control the visibility of other layers on this slide.

Variable=Slider1, Start=0, End=100, Initial=50, Step=1

Slider 2 is a regular slider whose Variable is also set to Slider1 – so moving this slider also moves the other one with the photo. Of course moving this slider left also moves the photo left, which looks like you are panning right, so I fixed this by reversing the Start and End values for Slider 2:

Variable=Slider1, Start=100, End=0, Initial=50, Step=1

Areas of Interest markers on  the panorama

I wanted the learners to search the virtual salon for areas of interest, but didn’t want to use mouse-over as that technique does not work on mobile devices. Instead, I chose to have markers appear when the photo was panned to a specific value. I added triggers to Slider1 which showed a layer with the marker if the value of Slider1 was between two values, and hid it if it wasn’t. For example:

Show layer loc1 
   when the slider moves
   if Slider1 is Greater than or equal to 94
   AND Slider 1 is Less than or equal to 96
Hide layer loc1 
   when the slider moves
   if Slider1 is Less than 94 
   OR Slider 1 is Greater than 96

Using a range of valid values (94, 95 and 96 in the example above) made it easier for learners to pan the slider and spot the markers; a single value (e.g. 95) was too difficult.

Returning to the virtual salon

The value of variable Slider1 is stored, so the virtual salon photo is automatically panned to the same point as it was when the learner last saw it when they return to the slide.

I wanted areas which learners had already visited to be visually indicated, so I created versions of the marker for each of these states:

sh-markers

The variable loc1 is set to TRUE when learners view the area of interest and is used by a Slide trigger to change the appearance (state) of the Button_loc1 on layer loc1:

Change state of Button_loc1 to
   Visited 
   when the timeline starts
   IF loc1 is equal to TRUE

I also added triggers to the frame image to make sure the correct layer was visible when learners return to this slide  (i.e. when the timeline starts as the slide is redisplayed):

Show layer loc1 
   when the timeline starts 
   IF Slider1 is Greater than or equal to 94 
   AND Less than or equal to 96
   AND loc1 is equal to TRUE

You can see that with 10 locations to find, this slide already had 40 triggers – and there were another 10 or more to add… but I’ll talk about some of those in the next article.

 

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